The entitlement

One’s entitlement often seems inequality to others.  Our badminton group has been playing together for years on this one court, relatively harmonic, even with players come and go.  There are no rules to govern but a sense of fairness.  Before Michael, there was a Mr. Huang who’s responsible to open/close the door and set up the net, etc.  When there are more than four players, which is the case most of time, we take turns.  With six players, the winning dual reminds on court for another set.  Regardless win or lose, they vacant the court for others after two sets.  This is one of the systems we set up without discussion.  When there are more than eight players, we only get to play a set, then wait for the next round.  Simple enough?  Yes, for those fair minded.

There is a player who often leaves early to pick up his wife, so we always let him play 2-3 sets uninterrupted.  Using a Hong Kong saying, we do this is 人情, make him wait just like the rest of us is 常情.  You’d think he’s appreciative to our consideration.  After all, we’re all busy with pressing matters that we need to attend to. 
Last night, his wife called for an early pick up just as we were about to begin.  So he came back 45 minutes later to resume. By that time we ballooned to ten players already.  He got on the court at the first turn.  It ended quickly, a land slide game.  
“Let’s play a singles” he challenged Jordan. 
That didn’t sit well with us. 
Sammy said,
“Oh no, too many people, doubles only.” 
So he played another set of doubles.  When he played again after waiting for his turn, he didn’t want to leave, saying he didn’t sweat. 
Simon and Sam all got off the court. 
There was a moment of stillness.  
We all try to be courteous to others, don’t want the confrontation. 
The players he wanted to play with, walked off the court and stayed off. 
They knew it’s others’ turn. 
I said out loud, “it’s girls turn.” 
Katie hadn’t played at all.  Not so much as boys or girls, rather others turn.

He stood on the court,  looking at Simon/Sam, didn’t want to leave. 

Katie said graciously, “it’s ok, I’ll wait.” 
It’s usual the case, what you can say?  So, he got to play again. 
Not with Simon nor Sam, but with girls.  Half through, he quitted. 
“I can’t play like this ..” 
By far, Simon is the better player and he had no qualm playing with the girls or weaker player.  Same goes with Sam.

It’s interesting to see next time. .. What a 八婆 gossip-monger 🙂 .. I’ve spent all my 八婆 quota of the month, if not the year; and it’s only January.  Good news is that my left hand is improving quickly.  Jenny and I won a set last night against Katie n her hubby Paul, lost two sets to Yvonne and Michael. 

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